l i n u x - u s e r s - g r o u p - o f - d a v i s
L U G O D
 
Next Meeting:
October 20: Web Application Hacking: How to Make and Break Security on the Web
Next Installfest:
TBD
Latest News:
Oct. 10: LUGOD Installfests coming again soon
Page last updated:
2010 Oct 31 12:48

The following is an archive of a post made to our 'vox mailing list' by one of its subscribers.

Report this post as spam:

(Enter your email address)
Re: [vox] Reasons you might not want to use OpenOffice
[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [vox] Reasons you might not want to use OpenOffice



In general this is correct.  FOSS as a development model started to take off with other OS's in 1999-2000 (which I noticed when a growing critical core of projectsstarted cropping up on SF.net for win32, Mac and eventually Palm).

Now it is simply ingrained among a growing set of coders.  My favorite GUI based SQL tool is FOSS (GPL v2), but currently only has a win32 binary (HeidiSQL)...and that is far from the only example of stuff like this.

Microsoft has zero incentive generally to promote FOSS-anything, especially if it impacts their core set of products (OS, Office/Backend, Project, Sharepoint)

ja

On Thu, Oct 28, 2010 at 12:44 PM, Ryan Northrup <northrupthebandgeek@gmail.com> wrote:
I think the Linux software being ported to Windows is more out of popular demand (and unwillingness to switch operating systems) than it is by Microsoft's direct influence.  Several Windows ports of Linux-originated software that I've seen were explicitly stated to be third-party projects, separate from the official project.  For example, QEMU, on the download page on the main site, is available solely as a source tarball (see http://wiki.qemu.org/Download for reference).  A Windows port isn't even mentioned, at least that I can tell (the Windows binary is available at http://www.h7.dion.ne.jp/~qemu-win/, clearly not the QEMU homepage).

In short, I'm convinced that many Windows ports are done by users hoping to be able to use this software without worrying about a new operating system, not by people being encouraged to do so by Microsoft.  Likewise, I'm certain that OpenOffice was created to provide a less-expensive alternative to Microsoft Office (which is expensive), not to prevent monopolistic accusations against Microsoft.

P.S.  I did some research on the relationships between Coke and RC Cola, and between Seiko and Casio.  Neither pairs are evidenced in corporate histories.  The closest thing there was to a relationship was a merger attempt between Coca-Cola and Dr. Pepper/Seven-Up (into which the RC Cola brand was folded into by both their owners, Cadbury Schweppes), which was blocked by the FTC.  Any benefit that one of these companies provided to the other is a side effect, and likely not nearly as great of a benefit as the maintenance of market dominance.

If I'm horribly mis-guided and incorrect, my apologies.

On Thu, Oct 28, 2010 at 9:10 AM, Michael Cheselka <cheselka@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,

Most of this doesn't apply to recent versions of OpenOffice.org.

As far as FS versus FOSS is concerned; they are the same thing.  FS is
considered vague( hence clarifying with "free as in speech vs free as
in beer") so people came up with FLOSS.  I personally believe it
should be Freedom Software or Freeing Software to make it easy and
clear.  Microsoft is in favor of free software because it enables them
to escape monopoly charges.  Also, Microsoft is currently wooing free
software developers to develop for Windows.  Many programs associated
with Linux are available for Windows now like Cygnus, GIMP,
OpenOffice.org, MPlayer, VLC, etc.* Many high end markets try to
control the low end, often by creating low products to compete with
their own high end products.  Hence, Coke introduced RC cola, Seiko
created Casio, etc...  Microsoft benefits from free software of all
types and would like to have more of it, not less.  The idea that
OpenOffice.org is threatening to Microsoft and that they would like to
stamp it out is not true.  They couldn't keep people from writing
useful programs and giving them away if they wanted.  It's guaranteed
as free speech.

There are numerous free software licenses but in my mind I simplify
them as either requiring you to contribute under some circumstances or
asking for nothing, or almost nothing, in return.
,
* of course the opposite has happened too, like Acroread, Skype,
Dropbox, VMware, and many others I can't name.

Regards,
Michael Cheselka
650-488-4820




On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 15:18, Will Marshall <marshaw3@imail.losrios.edu> wrote:
> On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 1:00 PM, Bill Kendrick <nbs@sonic.net> wrote:
>> On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 10:25:49AM -0700, Brian Lavender wrote:
>>> What you say is exactly what is happening. I ask technical questions
>>> on the list about OpenOffice and no one responds. I post an email as to
>>> why you might not want to use OpenOffice and the FLOSS'ers (FOSS as you
>>> call it) immediately jump to its defense.  I think we have a number of
>>> hobbyists on this list. There should be a Lugod elite organization. Those
>>> who practice it and those who get it. ;-)
>>
> Well, to a large degree before (and to some extent now) posting to
> this list, I just skimmed messages, and just trashed anything without
> immediate interest.  I doubt I'm the only person here who is
> subscribed to so many mailing lists that fully reading everything is
> impossible.
>
> There were also several messages where people stated a preference
> using LaTeX rather than any word processor (and indeed presentation)
> software.  Others defended using whatever worked, whether it was OO,
> MS Word, or iWorks.  I know that depending on what I need done, I'll
> use OO, Neo-Office, LaTeX, InDesign, Scribus, emacs, (or even vi) etc.
> Each has its strengths and drawbacks.  As to specific technical
> issues, I'll leave that to people who use $SPECIFIC_APP more regularly
> and thus, are more qualified to answer.
>
>> I think this is why we have 'vox' (general discussion, chatter, and
>> apparently arguments when I'm not paying attention)
>
> Oldest traditios on the internet: Fluff, thread-drift, and arguing :)
>
>> and 'vox-tech' for
>> the "how do I do this?" questions, and (hopefully) answers.
>>
> Great.  Yet another list to subscribe to.
>
> Regards,
> Will
>
> --
> "The effect of music is so very much more powerful and penetrating
> than is that of the other arts, for these others speak only of the
> shadow, but music of the essence." -- Schopenhauer
> _______________________________________________
> vox mailing list
> vox@lists.lugod.org
> http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox
>
_______________________________________________
vox mailing list
vox@lists.lugod.org
http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox


_______________________________________________
vox mailing list
vox@lists.lugod.org
http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox




--
Joseph Arruda
http://www.josepharruda.com
_______________________________________________
vox mailing list
vox@lists.lugod.org
http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox


LinkedIn
LUGOD Group on LinkedIn
Sign up for LUGOD event announcements
Your email address:
facebook
LUGOD Group on Facebook
'Like' LUGOD on Facebook:

Hosting provided by:
Sunset Systems
Sunset Systems offers preconfigured Linux systems, remote system administration and custom software development.

LUGOD: Linux Users' Group of Davis
PO Box 2082, Davis, CA 95617
Contact Us

LUGOD is a 501(c)7 non-profit organization
based in Davis, California
and serving the Sacramento area.
"Linux" is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Sponsored in part by:
O'Reilly and Associates
For numerous book donations.