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Re: [vox] Throttling router?
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Re: [vox] Throttling router?



The ICMP message is sent back to the sending host. The immediately upstream router doesn't see it (it just passes it on), and it's the sending host's responsibility to back off.

How do you implement this? The bandwidth shaping features of the kernel that you use to separate the traffic should send this automatically when you set a bandwidth limit.

You should also be able to make an application generate this messsage (although don't know what the APIs are). The result when you made an application do this would be to set a download speed limit like the GetRight download manager for Windows supports!

On 2004.02.18 09:07, Michael Long wrote:
> hmm... I'd be interesting on hearing how this works if people did it or
> even how you implement it. Although I'm not seeing what it gains you.
> Yes source quelch tells your upstream isp to backoff and throttle your
> bw but I thought the objective was to only throttle certian types of
> traffic. The data is still coming out you, just being que'd up at a
> different place instead of on your router now. With source quelch you're
> throtteling overall bw... so ya, mabye i'm not seeing it ;)
> 
> Mike
> 
> 
> On Wed, Feb 18, 2004 at 08:40:38AM -0800, Ken Bloom wrote:
> > It's certainly possible to throttle incoming bandwidth, by sending an
> > ICMP Source Quench error when a connection is sending data too fast.
> > Although the remote host is free to ignore this error message, my
> > networking textbook (Stevens - TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1) tells me
> > that BSD ignores it for UDP but pays attention and slows down for TCP.
> > I'm not sure what other operating systems do.
> > 
> > On Wed, Feb 18, 2004 at 12:45:01PM +0000, Michael Long wrote:
> > > 
> > > Keep in mind that all these solutions will only throttle bw upstream to
> > > your provider. There is no way to throttle bw coming from your provide
> > > because that would require putting acl's (or equiv) on the provider
> > > router. So unless you're streaming bw out these "fixes" won't help to
> > > much. 
> > > 
> > 
> > -- 
> > I usually have a GPG digital signature included as an attachment.
> > See http://www.gnupg.org/ for info about these digital signatures.
> > My key was last signed 10/14/2003. If you use GPG *please* see me about 
> > signing the key. ***** My computer can't give you viruses by email. ***
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> vox mailing list
> vox@lists.lugod.org
> 

-- 
I usually have a GPG digital signature included as an attachment.
See http://www.gnupg.org/ for info about these digital signatures.
My key was last signed 10/14/2003. If you use GPG *please* see me about 
signing the key. ***** My computer can't give you viruses by email. ***
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