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[vox] Olympus USB digicams, Linux superiority, *and Keywords
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[vox] Olympus USB digicams, Linux superiority, *and Keywords



Keywords: Olympus USB "digital camera" "Linux rocks" Keywords
Keywords: AutoConnect

I finally bought a digital camera Friday.  Spent all weekend trying to
get it working - downloaded gphoto2, compiled it, and then spent forever
trying to get it work.

Saturday, I got it working in Windows.  The way the driver works made me
suspect that the camera uses USB Mass Storage, rather than a digicam
protocol (this allows you to mount the device).  Okay, thinks I, this
should be easy.  Just have to mount the device, and presto!

Not so easy.  The usb-storage driver just plain doesn't see it.  Why? 
It should work.  Spend pretty much all of Sunday trying to find *any*
reference to the camera or related stuff.  Can't come up with anything
on google.  Finally find some stuff on the usb-storage mailing list
archive.  And the problem is....   Olympus USB AutoConnect cameras send
broken headers!  Windows works fine with them because....  windows
doesn't bother making the recommended checks for data packet sanity!  (I
suppose Macs don't either, since Mac drivers are also given.  Or maybe
the Windows/Mac drivers specially accept the broken headers).  Anyway,
the quick fix is to go into the Linux kernel and change the magic number
it expects for Mass Storage devices.  The right number is the ascii
sequence for "USBS" (backwards - I guess it must get reversed on the
wire; or it's just interpreted as a little-endian number).  They got one
of the characters wrong in their magic number, I guess.  Of course, by
changing it, all *legit* USB Mass Storage devices will no longer work. 
I don't care, I now have a fully functional digicam which I can use on
both Windows and Linux.  The USB kernel developers are apparently not
planning on fixing it real soon, since they *are* doing The Right
Thing.  If I get around to it, maybe I'll submit a patch which will
check the vendor ID, and if it's Olympus, accept the broken headers.  I
think that's the appropriate thing to do, as the average user won't
understand that Linux is the only one doing it "right" - they'll just
know that support for Olympus USB AutoConnect cameras is "broken".

---

On another note - what is the correct use of "Keywords" ?  It seems to
me the best way would be to use the standard "Keywords" header field
(which may occur more than once).  This stupid mailer doesn't let me
specify my own headers (so I'm gonna switch back to mutt or maybe EMACS
gnus' message-mode), but if it did, I'd have put the first two lines as
headers instead of in the message body.  Does the archive support this? 
If it supports it in the body, then it ought to in the headers, IMO.

---

If you respond to this message, please include only *either the "Olympus
USB digicam" or "Keywords" stuff - replace the rest with ellipses (...).

Micah

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