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Re: [vox-tech] Easiest way to calculate date in 100 ns increments?
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Re: [vox-tech] Easiest way to calculate date in 100 ns increments?



BTW, `cal 9 1752` may amuse some people:

   $ cal 9 1752
      September 1752
   Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
          1  2 14 15 16
   17 18 19 20 21 22 23
   24 25 26 27 28 29 30



   $ _

Somehow changing the locale doesn't change `cal`'s behavior.  It should,
though.  A bug, perhaps?

-Mark


On Wed, 23 Jun 2004, Mark K. Kim wrote:

> On Wed, 23 Jun 2004, emily wrote:
>
> > I need to be able to convert dates from a human readable format
> > (something like YYYYMMDD) to a number in hundred nanosecond intervals
> > starting from Jan 1 1601 as 0.
> >
> > I hope that makes sense. Anyways, for example, 12th Dec 2003 translates
> > to 126871488000000000.
> >
> > Anyone know a nice easy way to do it?
>
> Do you need to be able to represent dates between 1601 and 1970?  Most
> computers can't internally represent dates before 1970, so there are most
> likely no "nice easy" ways (no one straight-forward algorithm) in any
> platform or system.  At least September 1752 will need some tweaking (it
> has missing 11 days due to historical reasons, but I think only in
> England-origin calendars - other calendars skip 11 or more days in other
> months -- see
> http://users.skynet.be/sky60754/genealbe/hulpwetkalverhe.htm#Calendar%20Change%20Dates
> )
>
> Having said that, `date` is a nice tool for converting from human readable
> format to hour/minute/sec/nanosec if you're scripting, and the source is
> freely available if you're using C!
>
> -Mark
>
>
> --
> Mark K. Kim
> AIM: markus kimius
> Homepage: http://www.cbreak.org/
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> PGP key available on the homepage
> _______________________________________________
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> http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox-tech
>

-- 
Mark K. Kim
AIM: markus kimius
Homepage: http://www.cbreak.org/
Xanga: http://www.xanga.com/vindaci
Friendster: http://www.friendster.com/user.jsp?id=13046
PGP key fingerprint: 7324 BACA 53AD E504 A76E  5167 6822 94F0 F298 5DCE
PGP key available on the homepage
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