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2004 Jan 26 16:28

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Re: [vox-tech] how to capture error messages for getting help (was: 9600 pro + red hat 9 + gnome)
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Re: [vox-tech] how to capture error messages for getting help (was: 9600 pro + red hat 9 + gnome)



Nobody has said this yet AFAIK so I'll say it:

The ntfs module/driver for Linux to read/write to NTFS is considered
"beta" in some respects. Sure, reading is not really beta, but *writing*
is still an issue:

CONFIG_NTFS_RW
  If you say Y here, you will (maybe) be able to write to NTFS file
  systems as well as read from them. The read-write support in NTFS
  is far from being complete and is not well tested. If you say Y
  here, back up your NTFS volume first, since it will probably get
  damaged. Also, download the Linux-NTFS project distribution from
  Sourceforge at <http://linux-ntfs.sf.net/> and always run the
  included ntfsfix utility after writing to an NTFS partition from
  Linux to fix some of the damage done by the driver. You should run
  ntfsfix _after_ unmounting the partition in Linux but _before_
  rebooting into Windows. When Windows next boots, chkdsk will be
  run automatically to fix the remaining damage.
  Please note that write support is limited to Windows NT4 and
  earlier versions.

  If unsure, say N.

So, if you only want to read from an NTFS partition, it is great, but
writing is more risky. If I recall, it was "safe" to write if the file
being overwritten was the same exact size  after being altered. (Say
change a few bytes.) However, if you expanded the ize of a file, or
created a file, there could be trouble for the filesystem.

-ME

Mark Street said:
> Not Red Hat..  You have to compile it yourself. ; )
>
> # CONFIG_NTFS_FS is not set
> # CONFIG_NTFS_RW is not set
>
> On Monday 26 January 2004 11:36, Peter Jay Salzman wrote:
>> try:
>>
>>    modprobe -a ntfs
>>
>> if that doesn't work, see if "locate ntfs.o" gives you anything.  if
>> not, you're going to have to compile the NTFS module which allows you to
>> read, but not write to, an NTFS partition.
>>
>> you can compile the module without having to compile the whole kernel,
>> so that's a plus.
>>
>> i thought most linux distros kitchen sinked all the modules...
>
>
> --
> Mark Street, D.C.
> Red Hat Certified Engineer
> Cert# 807302251406074
> --
> Key fingerprint = 3949 39E4 6317 7C3C 023E  2B1F 6FB3 06E7 D109 56C0
> GPG key http://www.streetchiro.com/pubkey.asc
>
> _______________________________________________
> vox-tech mailing list
> vox-tech@lists.lugod.org
> http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox-tech
>
>

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