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Re: [vox-tech] [OT] Electrical Engineering Question
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Re: [vox-tech] [OT] Electrical Engineering Question



In general, resistance increases as heat increases.  Hence super
conductors are kept cold.  (Or another way to think of it is, for a single
electron, it is easier for it to travel through a crowd of other
electrons that aren't bouncing around than it is to go through a crowd of
other electrons that are... like a real-life traffic.)

-Mark


On Sat, 1 Feb 2003, Peter Jay Salzman wrote:

> ach, one more thing.  i can't believe i forgot this (but the truth is,
> my department knows i hate experimental physics, and has given me
> lectures and discussions for the past few years instead of running
> labs).
>
> light bulbs are highly non-ohmic (linear) devices.  the power they
> consume is highly dependent on the temperature of the filament.  in
> other words, the power they consume depends on how long they've been
> left on.   for the life of me, i can't remember whether they consume
> more or less power as they heat up.  for your sake, i hope it's less.
> :-)
>
> 250W is some kind of average; i don't know how they get that number, but
> i'm sure they have some kind of procedure like "leave the lightbulb on
> for an hour and divide by 3600" or something like that.
>
> from what i remember about the physics 9C labs, 25% sounds pretty
> reasonable to me.
>
> pete
>
>
>
>
> begin Jeff Newmiller <jdnewmil@dcn.davis.ca.us>
> > On Fri, 31 Jan 2003, Rod Roark wrote:
> >
> > > I got my first electric bill at the new house; looks too
> > > high.  So I decided to do an experiment.
> > >
> > > Outside the house is an electric meter.  It reads KWH
> > > accumulated on 5 dials, and has a horizontal platter that
> > > appears to spin about 100 revolutions per KWH (anyone know
> > > if this is exactly true for a standard meter?).
> > >
> > > So I figure that means 10 watt-hours per rev, or 36,000
> > > watt-seconds per rev.
> > >
> > > I timed one revolution with most things in the house turned
> > > off.  45 seconds.  Then I turned on a 250W light bulb and
> > > timed it again.  32 seconds.  So:
> > >
> > >   36,000 watt-secs / 45 secs =  800 watts
> > >   36,000 watt-secs / 32 secs = 1125 watts
> > >
> > >   1125 - 800 = 325 watts -- for a 250W bulb.
> > >
> > > How come?  Should I complain to PG&E, or is there some
> > > gotcha that I'm missing?
> >
> > Go look on your meter face for a number labelled Kh.  A typical value is
> > 7.2.  Units are Watt-hours per revolution.
> >
> > Count the number of seconds (S) it takes for the disk to revolve once. (I
> > usually time two or three turns and average. Total measurement intervals
> > between 40 and 90 seconds will usually give good results (though if it
> > spins three times you will need to remember to divide the total interval
> > by three before using the answer).
> >
> > Power = Kh * 3600 / S
> >
> > The only difference between your equation and mine is your use of Kh=10.
> >
> > Assuming you have a regular meter like mine, the calculation should yield
> > 810W - 576W = 234W, which could be reasonable. I don't know what kind of
> > light bulb you used... torchiers output is often adjustable. Beware of
> > "hidden loads" too... a refrigerator kicking off or on toward the end of
> > your measurement interval can reduce or increase respectively your
> > apparent load.
> >
> > For those looking to check these answers: the energy meter is almost
> > certainly more accurate than whatever test equipment the average computer
> > geek is likely to have laying around for measuring energy consumption
> > (energy meters have a tested accuracy of <0.3%).  P=V*I always for
> > simultaneous/instantaneous measurements, but the root-mean-square readings
> > typically reported by DVMs ONLY hold for _sinusiodal waveforms that are in
> > phase_.  Those conditions are often not valid in the real world, so beware
> > of getting out your DVM to double-check your energy meter. :)
>
> --
> First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you,
> then you win. -- Gandhi, being prophetic about Linux.
>
> Fingerprint: B9F1 6CF3 47C4 7CD8 D33E 70A9 A3B9 1945 67EA 951D
> _______________________________________________
> vox-tech mailing list
> vox-tech@lists.lugod.org
> http://lists.lugod.org/mailman/listinfo/vox-tech
>

-- 
Mark K. Kim
http://www.cbreak.org/
PGP key available upon request.

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